Winter and the Water Element

Updated: Feb 15, 2018




Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) Five Element framework is ancient and universal in what it embodies. The Five Elements are deeply woven into every fabric of Chinese culture. In fact, Five Element theory is the foundation of Chinese disciplines including feng shui and the martial arts.

The Five Elements are a comprehensive template that organizes all natural phenomena into five master groups or patterns in nature.


Each of the five groups—Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water—include categories such as a season, a direction, climate, stage of growth and development, internal organ, body tissue, emotion, aspect of the soul, taste, color, sound . . . the categories are seemingly limitless.


Winter is associated with water and the kidneys. The kidneys are the foundation of our yin and yang energies, store our Jing (or essence) and govern vital activities like birth, growth, reproduction and development. The kidneys are said to open into the ears, thus our ability to hear clearly is dependent on strong kidney energy. The kidneys also govern bones, teeth, hair on the head, the nervous system and brain.

Strong Kidneys The kidneys in Chinese medicine are not the same as they are seen in Western medicine. They are not simply two separate organs that sit at the level of the lower back, remove wastes and release hormones. They are enentire organ and energy system that is connected to the rest of the body, is paired with the bladder, and has important functions both physically and emotionally. When kidney energy is strong we are lucid and able to articulate our thoughts and feelings.


Children grow quickly, and have strong bones and teeth. They are smart, learn quickly and can think clearly. Strong kidney energy will also help a person move through the stages of life without difficulty, giving them the ability to adjust to changes and better able to cope with stresses that come along the way. Strong kidney energy also give the ability to take in information and process it effectively as we go through life, to make keen observations and making you seem wise beyond your years.

The Archetype for Water: The Philosopher

A person with a water type personality will have the following characteristics:

Sincere Introspective Modest Observant Sensible Lucid Curious Careful Innovative Resourceful Frugal Objective Particular


Working with you to understand which of the five elements best defines you, is just one of the many ways Traditional Chinese Medicine is different but complimentary to Western Medicine. Eca Brady is a fully licensed physician of Chinese Medicine BSc(Ac) MBAcC PGDip(CHM), practicing from Harley Street, London.


Make an appointment for an acupuncture treatment and we can discuss how we can help you, to read more about Eca click here.


Excerpts from the original article by CML. #WaterElement





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